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Why a Quality Roof is Worth Saving For

Whether you’re dealing with a storm-related emergency or just your garden-variety wear and tear, roof damage is never good news. Unfortunately, it’s bound to happen to all homeowners at one point or another. After all, even perfectly maintained roofs ultimately have a limited lifespan.

In the long run, how you handle these repairs is what matters most. While you don’t want to blow your budget, sacrificing quality is a sure recipe for a financial disaster down the road. To understand how spending more money on roofing right now can help you save more later; let’s get back to basics: materials and labor.

Not All Roofing Materials Are Created Equal

Your roof works around the clock to protect your home from bad weather, wind, animals and other outdoor threats, so shouldn’t it be armed with the best materials around? Think of your roof as a seal between your attic and the outside world. Without a strong barrier, you can end up with ongoing problems that run the gamut from water damage to raccoon nests and roof rat infestations.

Water damage alone can wreak havoc on your bank account. Besides obvious issues, like stubborn water stains and warped wood, excessive moisture creates a breeding ground for mold. Over time, fixing water damage from recurring leaks can add up to a lot more money than you’d save by choosing a cheaper roofing material.

Professional Installation is Worth the Extra Investment

In roofing, installation carries much more weight than the materials used. Without expert oversight, even the best materials can fall seriously short on function and durability. What separates the top contractors from the rest? Experience, licensing and a proven track record of customer satisfaction are good starting points in narrowing your search down to a reliable company. Because all three take time and money to develop, rock-bottom pricing is usually a warning sign that you aren’t getting the standard of service you deserve.

Keep in mind that you don’t need to spend a fortune to get your roofing project done right from start to finish. The key to getting the best bang for your buck is to find the perfect middle ground between an affordable price tag and a fair quality. Instead of taking the cheapest bid, let your overall budget guide you to the best option available in your price range.

Are you looking for quality roof repair services in Portland? Contact Interstate Roofing directly to learn more about our trusted roofing team and get started with your free estimate.

7 Common Roof Care Mistakes That Homeowners Make

Check out these roof care mistakes to make sure you’re doing things right. Does your ladder call your name when it’s time for roofing maintenance? You may get a great feeling when you take care of household projects by yourself, but if you don’t have experience and knowledge, it’s easy to make mistakes. When it comes to your home’s primary means of protection against the elements, errors can be costly. If your efforts to repair or maintain your roof do more harm than good, you may eventually face more extensive roof repairs. Even worse, you could end up with interior damage and mold caused by faulty work. Here are seven of the most common mistakes homeowners make when caring for their shingles.

1. Procrastination

No drip is harmless. If your roof is leaking, you have to act fast. A hidden leak can present itself with discolored walls and ceilings, warped wood, and mold growth. If you don’t repair it in a timely manner, you may experience the unique excitement of having your roof collapse.

2. Neglecting to Wash Your Roof

Accumulations of moss, mildew, dirt, and debris can hold water and create pressure that results in damage over time. Remove roof debris regularly. After several years, a pressure washing may be needed, but be very careful to avoid damaging the roof. The best practice is to use low pressure.

3. Not Installing a Moisture Barrier

If you decide to try to replace your roof, don’t forget to include a layer of moisture protection underneath. This defends your home against rain and accumulated snow and ice.

4. Trudging Across Delicate Materials

When conducting inspections, repairs, and maintenance, it’s important to distribute your weight as evenly as possible to avoid damaging your roof. Avoid walking near edges or areas that are hard to repair.

5. Improper Nailing Techniques

Hammering in nails at an angle can cause the fiberglass matting between a shingle’s asphalt layers to tear or weaken. Nails should be perpendicular to the shingle. It’s also important to avoid using too much force. An over-pressurized nail gun can cause as much damage as driving in nails sideways.

6. Installing the Wrong Type of Shingles

Not every house is designed to withstand heavier roofing materials. Be sure you know exactly what types of roofing options are appropriate for your home before you install.

7. Trying to Be a Superhero

If you’ve never installed or repaired a roof before, play it safe: contact a professional to handle your roofing needs.

Forget the Ladder—Call Interstate Roofing and Get It Done Right

When you need roof installation, maintenance, or repair, call the roofing contractors Vancouver and Portland trust. Interstate Roofing is a family owned business that started in 1988. More than 20 years of dependable service and exceptional workmanship has helped us establish our great reputation in our service area and beyond. For all your roofing, siding, window, and gutter needs, contact us to request a free estimate, and let us spare you the headaches associated with costly amateur mistakes.

Anatomy of a Roof: Important Parts to Know About

Understanding what’s up there.

Roofs are complex and have many parts. A roof is one of those things that people rarely think about. Usually, a roof is just there, doing what it’s intended to do: protect the interior of a structure. Take a look at your roof. What do you see? To most people, it doesn’t look like much. There’s a lot more going on up there than you can see from the ground. Your roof is a complex system with plenty of parts. Want to know what they are and what they do? Read on.

Ridge

The ridge is the highest part of a pitched—also known as “sloped”—roof. Most houses have pitched roofs for both aesthetic and practical reasons.

Roof Truss

Think of the truss as the skeleton of the roof. Comprised of beams fastened together in triangular patterns, the roof truss is the framework that holds the roof together.

Rafters

Rafters are the parts of the truss that run all the way from the top of the roof to the bottom. There are principal rafters, common rafters, auxiliary rafters and compass rafters. Some rafters are called kings and some are called hips.

Decking or Sheathing

This is the part of the roof that covers the rafters and provides a flat surface to which the shingles are attached. The sheath or deck is generally made with large sheets of plywood.

Underlayment

The part of a roof known as the underlayment is usually made of super heavy felt, although synthetic materials are available. Also called tar paper, the underlayment is placed atop the decking prior to installation of shingles. The underlayment provides an additional layer of moisture protection. Here in the Pacific Northwest, we can use all of that we can get.

Fascia

The fascia is a horizontal timber board that’s attached to the ends, or ‘feet’, of the rafters. Fascia is considered part of the trim and is the part to which rain gutters are attached.

Eaves

The word eave means edge and that’s exactly what it is: the lowest edge of the roof. Fancy or plain, the eaves project beyond the side of a structure and provide an overhang to prevent rainwater from accumulating along the base of the building.

Soffit

Stand under the eaves of your roof, look up, and you’ll see the soffit. It’s the finished underside of the eaves that project from the roof.

Valley

When two sloped roof planes intersect at an external angle of less than 180 degrees, it’s called a valley.

Hip

Whereas the valley of the roof describes the interior angle of two intersecting sloped roof planes, the hip is the external angle formed by the same intersection.

Gable

On a ridge roof, the gable is the triangular part of a wall just underneath the roof slopes on the side of a building.

Flashing

In roof anatomy, the flashing prevents water seepage around things such as chimneys, vent pipes and valleys.

Your roof might just be the most important part of your house, and we’re glad you took some time to learn more about it. Bookmark our homepage and revisit us when you require an on-time, quality roofing contractor in the Portland, OR, and Vancouver, WA, areas. We are Interstate Roofing and we provide 24-hour emergency roofing services. Contact us online, or call 503.684.5611  to speak to a member of our helpful staff.