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The Leak Detective Is In

We’re ready to solve your Portland, OR leaking roof mystery

In the Pacific Northwest, dealing with rain is a way of life. You may choose to ignore the constant downpour during your daily commute, and that’s okay. When the rain seeps into your home and you discover annoying drips or unsightly water stains, however, that’s when it’s time to take action. Ignoring the rain outdoors may only result in wet ankles and frizzy hair; neglecting to address the rain indoors could result in mold, the destruction of insulation, and rotting woodwork.

You may be tempted to tackle the job yourself, but what you may not realize is that discovering the source of a roof leak can be difficult. Contrary to common belief, the site of a water stain or drip may not be where the water is getting in from, so it’s best to consult the experts. An experienced roofing contractor will look for clues and perform some nifty tricks to find the source of the infiltration.

We Investigate Every Nook and Cranny

We may begin by examining your roof’s shingles or tiles as well any chimney seams to look for signs of mold or water damage. We’ll even crawl into your dusty attic if necessary to find telltale leak indicators. One of the easiest ways to tell, though, is often by using the water itself. By investigating where the water is flowing to and looking for paths that may lead to the stain, we may be able to find the suspect.

Common Leak Culprits

Common leak culprits include roof vents or vent boots. What are vent boots? Well, all homes have vents on their roof in order for sewer gases to release into the atmosphere rather than building up in your home. Installed over the vent pipe is a boot designed to keep water from leaking into the vent hole. Damage to the vent or boot may give the rain easy access to your home.

Nails and leftover mounting holes may also be the source of a water intrusion. These suspects are sometimes left behind after a roof repair or satellite dish installation. These leak sources are significantly smaller than faulty vents, so they are sneakier. You may discover that mounting holes have been letting small amounts of water into your home for months or even years. Fortunately, these tiny holes are simple to repair with a patch or new shingles.

Are you ready to stay dry indoors by interpreting the evidence and solving the puzzle? If so, contact us today for tips and additional help, or check out our homepage.